Reader Reviews

Last Man in London (Dec 18th 2013) 

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‘It is a post-religion, post-democracy, post-welfare and post-fossil fuel world. Civilization is run as an efficient business. The population is controlled. Nobody is hungry or homeless and everybody makes contribution to the Corporation that runs this world providing a permanently stable economy which makes profit.

Technology has advanced, there is abundant Wi-Hy (Wireless Hydrogen energy) to run the computing Hy-Devs (HydroDevices) and it is a world of trans-continental plasmapulsed hydrotrains which zip through to your destinations. But the people suffer from anxiety and depend heavily on diazepam.

Diazepam popping George Willoughby is unsettled by questions related to his origins. His grandfather Edgar is his only connection with the world from which the incorporated Orwellian era evolved…

The “Last Man in London And The New World Order” is a rivetting book. For many of us who are troubled by the current brutal manifestation of Islamic nihilism that threatens to derail civilization as we know it reading this work by itself provides moments of catharsis. This is a work of science fiction in the Jules Verne mould; remember “From the Earth to the Moon”? Why, even an established yet crazy physicist like Nikola Tesla had demonstrated wireless energy transmission as early as 1891! Thus nothing that Albert says in this book is beyond realization, it is indeed a work of futurology and very prophetic one at that!

According to Plato, democracy has the seeds of anarchy built into it and can easily degrade into tyranny. The fact that Wealth (capitalists) dictates governance is well known and Albert Jack makes a relevant reference to Lord Byron’s “The 12th canto of Don Juan” through the medium of the characters in this book and provides reasoning for the transition to incorporation from the decaying democracies of the West.

Unlike in the dystopian Hollywood flick “Elysium” where two classes of people exist: the very wealthy, who live on a luxurious space station called Elysium, and the poor who live on an overpopulated, devastated Earth; in the “Last Man in London” the corporation solves the problem of unwanted population by ingeniously sterilizing them through the medium of capsules in water supply and even vaccination – thus ensuring a future “utopia”, albeit using dystopian means.

Stanislaw Lem in his science fictional work “The futurological congress” depicts a future in which entire populations live in a world ordered by manipulating the mind through the medium of designer psychotropic drugs administered through tap water supply… But, I deviate was there a possibility to keep the population in check by such measures? Then again, sterilization is a better healthier alternative.

“Last Man in London” is a powerful and relevant piece of work; it has great Hollywood potential. But considering the atmosphere of apology and political correctness that prevails when it comes to things Islamic, I fear the cinematic potential of this lovely work may become difficult to realize. Do read it.’
Croucho Marx

‘I read this book in two days and really enjoyed it. This novel is full of interesting ideas. The marriage contract with a fixed term and the right to have children only if it is never broken means accountability for both parents. It should be the Law. It is humane.Many other ideas are so innovative. It is the dream of people to always want to move faster, further and more easily, and the whole idea of ​​wireless power is great. You have all this in the future that Alert Jack offers in Last Man in London.And more than that, I completely agree with the author’s views on religious matters. People should be free from organised religion and spiritually liberated. Even if they are forced to be, as they are here. This is the literary work of a highly creative and extremely intelligent writer. I can’t wait for the next one. Thank you for publishing this.’
Thu Ha Nguyen

‘Loved it! Brilliant & insightful. It feels like the type of fiction that Christopher Hitchens would have written, and I could tell that he heavily influenced it. The craziness of religions are very well elucidated. My favourite book of 2013. At the end of it, I asked myself; how else could the world reach a utopia than how it was described in the novel? The scary answer is; I can’t imagine another way.’
Godfrey Freeman

‘Wow the man does it again, brilliantly crafted, what incredible vision! all my friends will be getting a copy in their Christmas stocking!’
Paul Rickard

‘This is just a superb piece of work! Great analogies on the modern day world. I relate to the female characters as well. I love this!’
Swallow Pierce

‘Albert Jack presents a compelling vision of a utopian/dystopian corporate neofeudalistic vision of the future in his new novel, Last Man in London. Set in the middle of the 21st century, George Willoughby, a researcher for a global entity known as The Corporation, is tasked with editing novels of 19th century authors such as Dickens and Twain.

With all religion having been abolished by The Corporation, George slowly begins to discovers that The Corporation, a seemingly benevolent organization, which has supplanted nations as the de facto world government, may be hiding the true secret of humanity’s history and potential from those who are not among it’s elite.

The not-so-distant futuristic world, imagined by Albert Jack, in Last Man in London is like an incredible combination of Huxley’s Brave New World, Umberto Eco’s The Name of the Rose, and conspiracy theories about modern global elites all in one.’
Carter Lloyd

 

Money for Old Rope Parts One & Two
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lots of information, September 18, 2012

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This review is from: Money for Old Rope (The Big Book of Everything – Part 1) (Kindle Edition)

Money for Old Rope has a lot of information in it about how some of our phrases came about that we use, urban legends, etc. It’s very interesting.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars try it, you will love it, September 9, 2012
This review is from: Money for Old Rope (The Big Book of Everything – Part 1) (Kindle Edition)

this book manages tell you stuff that you heard of before but not really understood the ‘why’ in a humourous and really cool way that makes you want to find out more. albert has a nack of making facts relevant and interesting and easy to remember – I am all for sounding more intelligent. This book is really great and every home should have one. Cleverly it appeals to all ages

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars cool info.., September 9, 2012
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This review is from: Money for Old Rope (The Big Book of Everything – Part 1) (Kindle Edition)

This book gives a lot of cool info on the sayings we use today and what they orgnially were ment to be..
Very Cool check it out.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Conversation lubricant, September 6, 2012
This review is from: Money for Old Rope (The Big Book of Everything – Part 1) (Kindle Edition)

`Money for Old Rope’ is a brilliant collection of all of Albert Jack’s most interesting books. A great antidote to boredom, it’s full of anecdotes to kill being boring. Thanks Mr Jack – I am using mine as an almanac, trying to work at least one into conversation everyday. I would give it to my whole family… but then they’d know who my source was…

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tremendously entertaining, September 4, 2012
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This review is from: Money for Old Rope (The Big Book of Everything – Part 1) (Kindle Edition)

Albert Jack is a trained historian, but he clearly has focused much deep research on conversation in the world’s most popular pubs, savoring tall tales and the brilliant clichés of the English speaking people. Dr. Johnson would admire his talent as a dictionary maker, but Oscar Wilde (if not Ambrose Bierce) would find more to celebrate in Jack’s focus on strange and inexplicable fairy tales and sensational media stories. This book is tremendously entertaining, witty, and filed with a sagacious insight into the roots of our modern culture. Jack explicates every odd phrase–“go berserk,” “bell the cat,” break a leg”–even “money for old rope.” He traces the sightings of “Nessie” and finds that the old girl probably does not exist at all. But the visions at Fatima are another story, and may well have substance. Mr. Jack advises that you need not fear a cruise through the Bermuda Triangle, and you can stop worrying about Mafia involvement in the death of Marilyn Monroe. Did you ever wonder how nursery rhymes became so fractured and downright weird? This book tells the how and why. Read this book with a pint in hand, if not a stein of lager.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It really is everything!, September 2, 2012
This review is from: Money for Old Rope (The Big Book of Everything – Part 1) (Kindle Edition)

Mr Jack strikes again! This really is a big book (but you can still hold it!) of everything you need to know on things that you didn’t know you needed to.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Everything you wanted to know and more!, September 1, 2012
This review is from: Money for Old Rope (The Big Book of Everything – Part 1) (Kindle Edition)

As a kid I’d turn over my hard boiled egg, draw a face of humpty dumpty (and then smash him with a teaspoon). I loved the rhyme, the fat egg, the buttons of his waistcoat popping open, and always red ruddy cheeks. An army of soldiers in the background. On the next page he was history. All this and I never knew the why’s and what that made humpty dumpty such a fallen hero.
Until this brilliant book! This is an eye opener on trivia, idioms and phrases that are part of our history from the cradle to the pub. There are enough facts here to let you hold court at a dinner party, impress your friends in the pub, or entertain yourself with random outbursts of “wow I never knew that”. And no, I’m not telling you anything about that egghead….you have to read that for yourself.

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars fascinating, August 30, 2012
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This review is from: Money for Old Rope (The Big Book of Everything – Part 1) (Kindle Edition)

Ever wonder where common sayings or rituals come from such as saying “Bottoms up” when drinking for why we toast people? Well, if you didn’t, you may start to after a few pages into this book. I never before paid much attention to why I say certain things but this book is so full of funny, strange and fascinating facts about the history of random phrases, urban legends and even odd food facts that it really made me think about things differently. It’s not just a boring reference book either. Albert Jack really knows how to find the most interesting parts of the history and present it in an amusing way that makes this book very enjoyable to read.

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Money For Old Rope, August 30, 2012
This review is from: Money for Old Rope (The Big Book of Everything – Part 1) (Kindle Edition)

What a lovely quirky book written with a fabulous sense of humour, all those little sayings that you wondered where they came from – and now we know! I will definately be getting this for Christmas presents for my family – well done Albert Jack – another winner!

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great fun!!, August 30, 2012
This review is from: Money for Old Rope (The Big Book of Everything – Part 1) (Kindle Edition)

I love these kinds of books – I’m one of those people who will rely on an idiom and then says aloud “I wonder where that came from.” This is definitely one of those rare finds that will have you chuckling as you turn the pages and telling your friends “you know what I learned today?” A lot of fun to read, I recommend it to anyone who has an interest in the origins of some of the odd but commonplace things we say and do today.

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nice collection of stories, August 30, 2012
By
This review is from: Money for Old Rope (The Big Book of Everything – Part 1) (Kindle Edition)

Money for Old Rope a collection of best-selling books that reveal the origins and history of a number of stories from the past. This book of history is a good collection of trivia and tidbits one can squirrel away in your mind. The narrative includes a wide ranging topics, as one reviewer suggested, it is the history of everything you didn’t realize you wanted to know about, until you found out about it.

A digital version of the book can keep one entertained during long flight trips!

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Filled with Interesting Facts, August 30, 2012
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This review is from: Money for Old Rope (The Big Book of Everything – Part 1) (Kindle Edition)

I love having books like this in my collection. I have always had an interest history and learning where things originally came from. Money for Old Rope is a great book that touches on a whole array of subjects, urban legends being one of my favorites. It is written in a fun and entertaining way and I recommend it to anyone who wants to know a little bit about everything. This review was written by author of The Best Flat Belly Exercises (The Expert Series)

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Money For Old Rope, August 22, 2012
This review is from: Money for Old Rope (The Big Book of Everything – Part 1) (Kindle Edition)

Another fascinating read from Albert Jack! His books never fail to make you laugh, at the same time feeding you information that you would not ordinarily have even been aware of. Easy to pick up and put down, wonderful as gifts, and very good conversation pieces – I have yet to read one of his books that disappoints!

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Albert Jack is the master of this genre, August 18, 2012
This review is from: Money for Old Rope (The Big Book of Everything – Part 1) (Kindle Edition)

Albert Jack is a writer, comedian, historian and wordsmith! There are many imitators but Albert, if you know your literary history, is the original! With His Red Herrings And White Elephants debut he created his own genre. Since then he has consistently written witty, interesting, amazing, laugh out loud books that never disappoint. Money For Old Rope is an Albert Jack ‘Greatest Hits’ with a selection from his previous works complied for the E book generation. It’s a compendium of fascinating, scintillating facts, amazing and obscure and I highly recommend it for Albert Jack Fans old and new. I’m addicted to these kinds of books as I set and take part in pub quizzes but Albert Jack is head and shoulders above the rest. Just wanted to share my enthusiasm. Regards. JD.

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A big book indeed, August 17, 2012
This review is from: Money for Old Rope (The Big Book of Everything – Part 1) (Kindle Edition)

Money for Old Rope (The Big Book of Everything – Part 1)
Every questioners dream…
I’ve always been an enquiring mind and Money for Old Rope is like having my very own hand held encyclopaedia on hand. Why, where and what in the history of phrases and terms we use everyday, without consciously being aware of it, is all in one book. I find it difficult to put down and I think I now have one over all my friends; they say it and I know exactly where it’s come from.
Love Albert Jacks tongue in cheek manner and cant wait for Part 2..

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A fun and interesting read – highly recommended, August 16, 2012
By
Mark Griffioen (Johannesburg, South Africa) – See all my reviews
This review is from: Money for Old Rope (The Big Book of Everything – Part 1) (Kindle Edition)

I have been looking out for Albert Jack’s books after reading his first book ‘Red Herrings and White Elephants’. This book has even more interesting content than the original edition. It is a great reference book which is entertaining without one having to wade knee-deep into foot-notes and what-not. I love that it is so extensive and thorough, yet the tone is light and the book is easily readable. I think both native speakers and people speaking English as an additional language will benefit by having a book like this. You get a crash-course in colourful sayings as well as a crash-course in history! I personally think it is the best book out on the market of this kind.

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Another winner from Albert Jack, August 16, 2012
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Speak up (Cape Town, South Africa) – See all my reviews
This review is from: Money for Old Rope (The Big Book of Everything – Part 1) (Kindle Edition)

Books like this one, which are packed with information, tend to be dry and dreary. But not if they’re written by Albert Jack. His are eminently readable. They’re fast-paced with a generous dose of humour, much of it tongue in cheek. I first picked up one of his books in a book store, started reading somewhere in the middle and was immediately caught up in it. I didn’t want to put it down till I’d reached the end of the story. This, his latest book I think, is no exception. It has many fascinating chapters. For instance, I thoroughly enjoyed the piece about crop circles. There’s lots of information which was new to me, and very entertainingly told. Also great that it’s in e-book format. Another winner, Albert. Keep them coming!

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fun, factual, and fascinating, August 16, 2012
This review is from: Money for Old Rope (The Big Book of Everything – Part 1) (Kindle Edition)

Albert Jack does it again – Money For Old Rope is a readable, funny book packed from cover to cover with the best fascinating facts compiled from his other works. Full of random things I didn’t even know I wanted to know until I flipped through it, this book is bound to hook you in and keep you reading too.

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Pockets full of Money for Old Rope, August 16, 2012
This review is from: Money for Old Rope (The Big Book of Everything – Part 1) (Kindle Edition)

Money for Old Rope is fascinating! There are tons of tidbits in there to keep me reading and re-reading to expand my knowledge base of contemporary phrases and stories. My friends are getting sick of me explaining the origins of stuff. In addition to a good read, it is quickly becoming a reference book for the odd and obscure histories that are relevant everyday. I see there are several other books by the same author for other origins of expressions and myths, so I will be getting them as well. Thanks for this Mr. Jack, keep them coming! What’s next?

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What a great idea…., August 15, 2012
This review is from: Money for Old Rope (The Big Book of Everything – Part 1) (Kindle Edition)

This is one of the most interesting books I have seen for years. Full of all that sort of information I always wanted to know. Who really was Humpty Dumpty. And the Blinde Beggar pub I used to use in Whitechapel… who was the Blind Beggar? And that story about the opera singer Nellie Melba and the way ice cream was invented for, and named after, her – fascinating. But my favourite is the mystery section and the way Jack writes about the bermuda triangle, Loch Ness Monster and the ‘mysterious’death of marylin munroe. hilarious. Every page gave me something to talk about down the pub

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good collection of stories 30 Aug 2012
Format:Kindle Edition
Money for Old Rope a collection of best-selling books that reveal the origins and history of a number of stories from the past. This book of history is a good collection of trivia and tidbits one can squirrel away in your mind. The narrative includes a wide ranging topics, as one reviewer suggested, it is the history of everything you didn’t realize you wanted to know about, until you found out about it.A digital version of the book can keep one entertained during long flight trips!

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Money for Old Rope 29 Aug 2012
Format:Kindle Edition
I downloaded this book at the weekend and thoroughly enjoyed it….easy reading and would make a fantastic Christmas or Birthday present for anyone.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I am no longer a bore 6 Sep 2012
Format:Kindle Edition
‘Money for Old Rope’ is a brilliant collection of all of Albert Jack’s most interesting books. A great antidote to boredom, it’s full of anecdotes to kill being boring. Thanks Mr Jack – I am using mine as an almanac, trying to work at least one into conversation everyday. I would give it to my whole family… but then they’d know who my source was…

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4.0 out of 5 stars Really interesting reading ! 18 Nov 2012
Format:Kindle Edition|Amazon Verified Purchase
I downloaded this on my kindle and couldn’t put it down , as well as covering phrases that we use in conversation, the book also covers the meaning of nursery rhymes , origin of words, popular urban myths and mysteries.My complaints with the book (which is why I gave it a four star rating rather than five) , are that there are typing errors throughout the book such as ‘the the’ and some of the information from the phrases portion of the book is repeated in the words portion of the book, which although they are connected makes the reader feel that the author sees them as stupid to not make the connection themselves. Plus it is boring to have to read the same information twice.Overall though , I would recommend downloading this book as there are some quite entertaining facts in there, and considering that it is free (as is the second book) , the typing errors and mistakes can be forgiven and overlooked.

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